Valley of the Sun Casual Club
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Forum Updated Index

If you wanted to look at the Magic Star . You will see that it is in the forum F6 . If you click F6 you wiil see just those 12 forums . Then you can look in each one at all the topics in them .


F1 ALL MEMBERS BRIEFLY INTRODUCE YOURSELF
2015 NEW ANNOUNCEMENTS

F2 Valley of the Sun CC SITE AND FORUM GUILDELINES
VOTSCC TOURNAMENT MAKING GUIDE
VOTSCC OUR WGT CC BASIC PROTOCOL

F3 Valley of the Sun CC HALL OF FAME REPLAY BLOOPERS
Valley of the Sun CC BEST OF REPLAYS

F4 WORLD CLOCK

F5 RECENT TOURNEY WINNERS
VOTSCC "KICK ASS" 100,000 POINT CLUB MEMBERS

F6 FORUM FOR PAGE 3 & SAT & SUN BRACKETS & TOURNEY INFO HERE
FLASH MOB & ECGA POKER & MY LEAGUE POOL HALL PROS
PERFECT GOLF
LEXMARK 2500 CREDIT TOURNEY
CLASH RULES AND RESULTS
BLITZ OFFICIAL RULES
DAILY BLITZ SCORES ONLY
THE MAGIC STAR
CHALLENGING THE KING
VOTSCC INTERPLAY CC VS CC MATCHES
ACE'S " Best of the Alternate Shot Championship "
JUNE28 RATTLESNAKE ALT SHOT

F7 VALLEY OF THE FUN
CRAZY WGT SHIT
DON"T CHOKE IT "JOKE IT "

F8 FORUM OF HOW TO'S
TIPS FROM THE DOCTOR OF TECHNOLOGY AZDEWARS
WGT GAME TIPS & TRICKS

F9 Current Events ,,Announcemets , Bulletin Board Part 1
AZ "HOT SHOTS" REMEMBERED
HIGH FIVES TO THE SKIES
RANDOM SELFLESS ACTS OF KINDNESS

F10 VOTSCC CC CLUBHOUSE
CC CART GIRL
TOURNEY TALK
GET YOUR CC TOURNEY ON

F11 CHAT ? ANYONE HERE TO CHAT WITH ?

F12 ANYTHING ELSE ?
DAVID LANES KICK ASS GALLERY OF ART
FORUM OF OLD WGT FORUM POST'S (archives)
HEY JOE
OFF THE WALL , THX FOR A WALL OF A GOOD TIME
Gallery
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FORUM UPDATE
THIS FORUM IS FOR YOU ALL . PLEASE FEEL LIKE IT IS YOURS . READ THE FORUMS. POST COMMENTS . ASK QUESTIONS . IF YOU HAVE A COMPLAINT POST IT . MAKE SUGGESTIONS . READ SOME TUTORIALS . READ SOME GOLF TIPS . CHECK RECENT TOURNEY WINNERS . BROWSE OUR OLD FORUM ARCHIVES . LOG IN TO THE CHAT AND MESSAGE SOMEONE TO MEET YOU THERE AND ARRANGE A MATCH . LOG IN TO THE CHAT TO SEE IF SOMEONE IS THERE JUST TO SAY HI . MESSAGE ME IF YOU WANT TO GET ON THE DAILY BLITZ .
THE BLITZ SCORECARD IS ON Page 3 PLEASE CLICK HERE
TO FIND THE COURSE OF THE DAY AND SEE
THE WEEKLY STANDINGS . PLEASE POST
YOUR SCORES HERE. IN THIS

Bilko’s Putting Calc
Here is a link to Bilko's Putting Calc and Wind Calc
Just download and install
Owner’s Objectives

It's been a while since I expressed some of my objectives for the CC . First of all I like and respect everyone that joins our club . I realize that not everyone knows what a CC is all about . Many have different reasons for joining . I really don't know how many of the other clubs are run . They are all different . What I want to emphasize in our CC is that whatever tier you are . That you feel comfortable here , part of a team of players that come here to find conditions that enable them to improve their game , hone their skills , lower their scores ,lower their averages , move up in tiers . Enjoyably and comfortably with the conditions that challenge them enough to keep that drive without the frustrationsof regular game play . All that is completely possible by either creating those tourneys yourself or by messaging me about it . Or someone else in your tier that has been creating tourneys . Any kind of information that you need to know should be provided here , any kind of appp , calculator , help , tutorial , tournament , statistic , message , opinion , gripe , compliment , etc , etc . Should able to be aqcuired here ( or in our website , as it may be easier there ). With your help , all of this can be done easily . We already have a good start . I am going to be here for a very long time trying to achieve all this . For any of you that think it's a good direction for your CC to go in . Then lets keep on keepin on . Sincerely , Your Co team member PDB1 , Paul ( sitting here on a rare rainy day ) May the SUN always be with you
POST OF THE WEEK

Re: Where are the Flags ?By Bertasion in Valley of the Sun Casual Club The other day upon the heather fair I hit a flagstick that was not there. I saw it's shadow and heard the clank but where it stood was just a blank. It was not there again today. I wonder when it will come back and stay. Brian
BLITZ LIST
HERE IS THE LIST OF BLITZ COURSES IN THE ORDER THEY ARE PLAYED EVERY WEEK OF EVERY SEASON .

DAILY BLITZ WEEKLY SCHEDULE



WEEK 1

BEST OF BANDON PAR 3
PEBBLE BEACH
THE OLYMPIC CLUB
VAHALLA
MERION


WEEK 2

PINEHURST NO.2
HARBOUR TOWN
KIAWAH ISLAND
ROYAL ST. GEORGE
CONGRESSIONAL


WEEK 3

OAKMONT
ST. ANDREWS
BALI HAI
CELTIC MANOR
BETHPAGE BLACK


WEEK 4

PINEHURST NO. 8
WOLF CREEK
CHALLANGE AT MANELE
EXPERIENCE AT KOELE
HILVERSUMSCHE


WEEK 5

EDGEWOOD TAHOE
BEST OF WATER SHOTS
BEST OF FAMOUS SHOTS
BEST OF PUTTING
CHAMBERS BAY

TIER & AVERAGE REQUIREMENTS
BASIC LEVEL AND AVERAGE REQUIREMENTS

You need to play at least 5 ranked rounds as hack before reaching Amateur.
When your average score is equal or smaller than 100 you go from Hack to Amateur.

You need to play at least 10 ranked rounds as amateur before reaching Pro.
When it is equal or smaller than 80 you go from Amateur to Pro..

You need to play at least 20 ranked rounds as Pro before reaching Tour Pro.
When it is equal or smaller than 72 you go from pro to Tour Pro.

You need to play at least 25 ranked rounds as Tour pro before reaching Master.
When it is equal or smaller than 67 you go from Tour Pro to Master.

You need to play at least 40 ranked rounds as Master before reaching Tour Master.
When it is equal or smaller than 63 you go from Master to Tour Master.

You need to play at least 50 ranked rounds as Tour Master before reaching Legend.
When it is equal or smaller than 61 you go from Tour Master to Legend.

You need to play at least 500 ranked rounds as Legend to saturated ( average stops going up ) before reaching Tour Legend.
When it is equal or smaller than 60 you go from Legend to Tour Legend.

You need to play at least 200 ranked rounds as Tour Legend to saturate ( average stops going up ).
When it is equal or smaller than 60 you go from Tour Legend to Champion.

You need to play an additional 200 ranked rounds as Tour Legend before reaching Champion.


You need to play another 200 ranked rounds as a Champion to saturate ( average stops going up ).


You need to play an undisclosed number of additional rounds and receive an exclusive personal invitation before reaching Tour Champion.

Protect Yourself, Please, Do It Now !!!

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subject title Protect Yourself, Please, Do It Now !!!

Post by azdewars on Thu 10 Dec 2015, 16:55

THESE ARE TRUE FACTS  ABOUT A BET THAT LEAD TO MrX's DEMISE
During a conversation i mentioned that the one(1) thing to remember about Internet Security is "There is no Security". Some blah blah blah was suddenly halted by "I BET YOU". The bet was that  Apple / iTunes iCloud Activation Lock is a solid security feature which was the selling point behind all iDevices. A factory reset still had user confront the "iCloud Activation Lock" page. Sooooooo.
This past Monday evening,  Mr.A got into Mr.X's  Apple account, remotely erased the data on his iPhone, iPad, and MacBook, deleted his Google account and commandeered his Twitter account, and then posted a string of nasty stuff under Mr.X’s name.
Put That In Your Pipe and Smoke It...
Mr.A got into Mr.X's account not by guessing his passwords but by asking for them. On Monday, Mr.A called Apple’s tech support line and, pretending to be Mr.X, claimed he’d been locked out of his Apple account. Apple’s support guy asked the Mr.A  to answer the security questions on Mr.X’s account, but Mr.A said that he’d forgotten the answers.
No problem, because the Mr.A  knew something most of us don’t: If you can’t answer your security questions, Apple will issue you a new password if you can prove that you’re who you say you are using another form of identification. What identification does Apple ask to reset your password? A billing address and the last four digits of your credit card number.
Billing addresses are easy to find online, and credit card numbers are only slightly more difficult to come by. Mr.A had both bits of data on Mr.X. He’d found the billing address by looking up the registration of Mr.X’s personal website, and he’d gotten the credit card number by calling the support line of another tech behemoth, Amazon. Mr.A asked Amazon to place his—Mr.A's—email address on Mr.X’s account, which Amazon happily did. Then the Mr.A issued a forgotten password request on Amazon’s website—this sent a link to the Mr.A’s email, allowing him to change Mr.X’s password and get full access to his Amazon account, including the ability to see the last four digits of his credit card.
Bingo! Now Mr.A could get into Mr.X’s Apple account, which allowed him to delete everything connected to Mr.X’s iCloud profile (his iPad, iPhone, and Mac). Because Mr.X had set his Apple account as his Google account’s alternate address, Mr.A only had to issue another forgotten-password request for Mr.X’s Gmail to fall, too. 
Here are the four things users and companies could do immediately to reduce these kinds of attacks:
1) Everyone should turn on two-factor authentication now.
To get into most online accounts, you only need to dig up a single piece of data—a password. (The username on many services—including email accounts, Twitter, and Facebook—is your public handle, available to everyone.)
There was a time when passwords were enough (and you should follow my advice on how to create very strong, easy to remember passwords). But now we’ve all got so many online accounts protecting so much valuable information that we need something in addition to passwords.
Fortunately, that something exists. Unfortunately, very few people use it. It’s called “two-factor authentication”—a security system that requires two credentials to let you into an account. The first is something you know—your password. The second is something you have with you: a biometric marker (say, your fingerprint), an electronic key tag, or—easiest of all—a cellphone that can generate a unique code.
Last year, Google turned on two-factor authentication for its accounts. The system works pretty well: After you turn it on, install the “authenticator” app on your smartphone. Now, when you log in, you type in your password and the code generated by your phone (it works even if your phone is offline). If you don’t have a smartphone, you can also have the code texted to you. Facebook also added two-factor authentication last year.
The problem with two-factor authentication is that it’s a bit of a hassle. You can set your Google account to only ask you for the code every two weeks on registered devices, but for some lazy people that’s too much trouble. Worse, because some programs that connect to your Gmail account don’t use two-factor authentication—programs like your smartphone’s mail app—you need to jump through some extra hoops to configure them to work with the system. All this requires a little bit of tech savvy, and the whole thing is not quite user-friendly enough for the majority of computer users just yet.
I’d guess that’s why Apple hasn’t added two-factor authentication to its services. But I hope Apple is working on some way to make this level of protection easy enough for the masses. (One option: built-in fingerprint readers in all its devices.) If such a system was in place, the attack on Mr.X’s Apple devices wouldn’t have happened. Mr.A might have gotten his password, but he wouldn’t have had the second factor—fingerprint, code, something—to get into his accounts.
Mr.X also didn’t have two-factor authentication enabled on his Google account. If he had, Mr.A would not have been able to get into his Gmail after compromising his Apple account. Mr.A would have still been able to issue the forgotten password request to Gmail, but he’d have lacked the authentication code generated by Mr.X’s smartphone.
2) Seriously, sign up to a backup service. Do it now. What are you waiting for?
This one is easy: You should be backing everything up. There’s a good chance you’re not. Maybe you think doing so is difficult or expensive. Maybe you think nothing will happen to you. Maybe you’re just putting it off until your next free weekend.
But the perfect time to do it is now. Despite what you’ve heard, backing up is easy and cheap. Years ago, after testing out a few cloud backup services, I recommended that people use Mozy. Since then, I’ve switched to a service called CrashPlan—the cheapest, easiest way to back up all your data.
Here’s how to do it. Go to CrashPlan. Download the software. Choose the stuff on your computer you want to back up—your documents, photos, videos, music, etc. Then, let the program run. Over the next few days, depending on how much data you have and the speed of your broadband line, your data will first be encrypted and then sent over to CrashPlan’s servers, where it will be secured far better than you can secure it.
For all this, CrashPlan’s rates (after your 30-day free trial) are really great: You’ll pay as little as $1.50 a month for storing 10 GB of data from one computer, $3 a month for unlimited data from one computer, and $6 a month for unlimited data from up to 10 computers (in other words, for protecting all the devices in your house).
Whenever I recommend cloud backup services, people chime in with worries about storing stuff in the cloud—what if CrashPlan’s servers get destroyed or hacked? I think these worries are baseless (if CrashPlan gets hacked, your data there is encrypted anyway), but when it comes to backups, you can never be too safe. So if you want to supplement your cloud backup with a local backup on your own external drive, please do so. You can even use CrashPlan’s software to do that.
Does this read like an advertisement for CrashPlan? The company hasn’t paid me a dime to write this, but I’m not kidding when I say that CrashPlan is the most important, valuable add-on service that you can buy for yourself.
Indeed, if I were king of the Internet, I would turn on backups by default. Every device you buy should come with a backup system, and it should store your data online automatically unless you tell it not to. The first company to realize this will make a killing. If Apple really wants to do right by its users, it would buy CrashPlan, build its service into all its devices, and offer unlimited backups to everyone for free. Apple has enough money to do this, and the firm must understand how well built-in backups would work in a marketing campaign: “Never lose anything again.” How’s that for a slogan?
3) Remote wiping is unnecessary. Turn off “Find My Mac.” Instead, encrypt your data.
Being able to find your lost devices sounds great. You paid a lot for that tablet, phone, and laptop. Why wouldn’t you want to locate it if it’s gone? And if someone else has it, wouldn’t you want to delete your stuff remotely so that they can’t monkey with your data?
In theory, sure. But the way that Apple implements its “Find My” system isn’t very secure. If a hacker gets into your iCloud account, he doesn’t need any other credentials to find your devices and delete all your data. That’s what happened to Mr.X, and it could happen to you, too.
Until Apple figures out a better way to protect against others wiping your data (perhaps by requiring a second form of authentication for remote wipes), you should turn off Find My Mac.
But what happens if someone gets your computer—how will you prevent unauthorized access to your data if your computer gets into the wrong hands? It turns out there’s a better security system than remote delete: It’s called whole-disk encryption, and it’s built into the Mac and some versions of Windows. You just have to turn it on. (Here’s how to do so in Mac OS Lion, and here’s how to do so in the Ultimate or Enterprise versions of Windows 7.)
Whole-disk encryption works by scrambling all of the bits on your entire hard drive; the only way to gain access to the data is by entering a password. (Here, too, of course, it would be better if two forms of authentication were required.) Turning encryption on slows down your computer by a tiny bit, but it’s not that big of a deal. And when your computer is gone, you can be sure that your data is safe—unless the hacker knows your password, your data will remain hidden to him.
4) Password recovery is a menaceMake sure your accounts aren’t daisy-chained together.
Lastly, you should examine how your various online accounts are linked through forgotten password request services. In particular, look up your various important email accounts, financial accounts, social networks, and other services. Each of these accounts will ask you for an email address where your password requests should be sent.
If they’re all pointing to one another, a single hack could let an attacker get into everything else. For instance, if Gmail is set to send password resets to your Apple account, and your bank is sending requests to Gmail, then all the hacker needs to do to wreak havoc on your finances is steal your iTunes password (which is probably not very strong, because you hate typing out a tough password on a touchscreen to download apps). With your iTunes password, he can get into Gmail through a password request, and once inside Gmail, another password request will let him into your bank. This is exactly what happened to Honan.
What should you do about this? I would create a single, secret, ultra-secure email address that you designate as the one place to send all password resets. What do I mean by ultra-secure? I mean a new Gmail account—something like betyoucantguessthis@gmail.com—with a very strong password and two-factor authentication turned on. Now go to all your other accounts and have them send password requests to this secret address. It’s important that you don’t use this address for anything else—don’t send mail from it, don’t use it to sign up for newsletters, don’t let anyone know that it has anything to do with you. As long as it remains secret, any password resets that are sent its way should be safe.
Nothing online is perfectly secure—determined hackers can get into anything if they really put their minds to it. But the guy who attacked Mr.X wasn’t some mastermind. He was a guy who just wanted to wreak havoc, and he happened to know about a few key vulnerabilities at Apple, Amazon, and in the systems that govern our online lives. But a few simple steps would have made his attack much more difficult. The stuff I’m suggesting isn’t hard to do. You should do it now.
The Ball is in Your Court, This post is for educational purposes ONLY. Not liable for any repercussions from any misuse of  this data.
Trust the effort that went into presenting this report will benefit any member of VOTSCC  that believes in preventive maintenance of their data.
John - azdewars

azdewars
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