Valley of the Sun Casual Club
Welcome to VOTSCC . Please enjoy the many features . You may login at anytime to be part of our community .
Valley of the Sun Casual Club
Would you like to react to this message? Create an account in a few clicks or log in to continue.
Log in

I forgot my password

April 2024
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930     

Calendar Calendar

Statistics
We have 474 registered users
The newest registered user is bitaacademy

Our users have posted a total of 44162 messages in 6518 subjects
71 WGT TUTORIALS & 32 YOUNG46 TUTORIALS
CLICK HERE TO SEE OVER 100 YOUTUBE VIDEO TUTORIALS . FROM WGTers , WGT & YOUNG46
FORUM UPDATE
TO THE MANY WELCOME GUESTS . THIS FORUM IS NO LONGER A COUNTRY CLUB WEBSITE FOR A WGT COUNTRY CLUB . PLEASE FEEL FREE TO READ THE FORUMS.
THERE ARE MANY TOPICS OF INTEREST . OR NOT . THIS WEBSITE IS AN INFORMATION AND ENTERTAINMENT WEBSITE ONLY .
MUCH OF THE CONTENT IS ARCHIVES OF PURPOSES PAST .
THERE ARE SOME MORE CURRENT TOPICS .
REGISTRATION IS NOT NECESSARY TO READ THROUGHOUT .
REGISTRATION IS EASY AND FREE . THIS IS AN AD FREE WEBSITE . NOTHING IS EVER REQUESTED FROM REGISTERED MEMBERS .
REGISTRATION ENABLES COMMENTING ON TOPICS . POSTING NEW TOPICS . FULL ACCESS TO THE WEBSITE IMAGE HOST . WHICH IS A VERY COMPLETE AND CONVENIENT TOOL .
PLEASE ENJOY .

Bilko’s Putting Calc
Here is a link to Bilko's Putting Calc and Wind Calc
Just download and install
TIER & AVERAGE REQUIREMENTS
BASIC LEVEL AND AVERAGE REQUIREMENTS , AND SATURATION

WHILE YOUR HERE
WHILE YOUR HERE :
CHECK OUT THE INCREDIBLE PHOTOGRAPHY IN
MY SERIES

THIS USED TO BE THE HOME OF OUR WORLD CLOCK . WHICH CAN NOW BE FOUND IN ITS OWN FORUM ON THE MAIN PAGE ..
THERE ARE MORE WORLD CLOCKS INSIDE HERE .

WORLD CLOCK

FB Like

DICTIONARY SCOOP * Seasonal Words: Christmas Edition! *

Go down

DICTIONARY SCOOP * Seasonal Words: Christmas Edition! * Empty DICTIONARY SCOOP * Seasonal Words: Christmas Edition! *

Post by Paul Sun 24 Dec 2023, 10:24 pm

GARLAND IS NOT JUST JUDY’S LAST NAME
Seasonal Words: Christmas Edition!



Published on December 22, 2023




DICTIONARY SCOOP * Seasonal Words: Christmas Edition! * ZoOUxJBA
Credit: Jonathan Borba

Every season has its peculiarities. Quirks, habits, colors, songs, recipes, and yes, even specific lingo. The Christmas season is no different in this regard: it is a time for family, friends, and festivities, but it's also a time for unique vocabulary that adds to the spirit of the season. From traditional terms to popular slang, here's a guide to some of the words that make Christmas special. Go ahead and read on. Perhaps you will even find yourself using one of these words next Christmas!


1

Yuletide


DICTIONARY SCOOP * Seasonal Words: Christmas Edition! * WzeHORix
Credit: julien Tromeur

The word Yuletide has become synonymous with Christmas, conjuring images of cozy fireplaces, twinkling lights, and the warmth of family gatherings. Yet, its origins lie in a pre-Christian Germanic tradition. Over time, as Christianity spread throughout Europe, the Yuletide festivities were gradually incorporated into Christmas celebrations. The pagan rituals were replaced with Christian traditions, but the word "Yule" persisted, serving as a reminder of the pre-Christian roots of the holiday.


2

Kris Kringle


DICTIONARY SCOOP * Seasonal Words: Christmas Edition! * ZUoepoUR
Credit: Absar Pathan

As with "Yuletide," nowadays, the name "Kris Kringle" is synonymous with Santa Claus, but it is believed to have originated from the German word Christkindl , which means "Christ child." In Germany, _Christkind_l was a traditional figure who brought gifts to children on Christmas Eve, represented by an angel. Over time, the name Christkindl morphed into "Kris Kringle," and its association with Santa Claus grew even stronger.


3

St. Nicks


DICTIONARY SCOOP * Seasonal Words: Christmas Edition! * WpiVdLSl
Credit: Srikanta H.U

Let us close the round of Santa Claus names with this one, the name good ole’ Santa had before being Santa. The nickname "St. Nicks" stems from the historical figure of Saint Nicholas, a 4th-century bishop of Myra, Turkey. Saint Nicholas was known for his kindness, generosity, and devotion to children. He became the subject of many legends and stories, often depicted as secretly giving gifts to the poor and needy.
Over time, the Dutch adopted Saint Nicholas as their patron saint of children, calling him Sinterklaas (sounds similar already when pronounced out loud, doesn’t it?). When Dutch settlers arrived in New Amsterdam (now New York City) in the 17th century, they brought their Sinterklaas traditions with them. The English-speaking local folks gradually transformed Sinterklaas into Santa Claus, but the nickname "St. Nicks" persisted even to this day.


4

Advent


DICTIONARY SCOOP * Seasonal Words: Christmas Edition! * QZSaYoTt
Credit: Elena Mozhvilo

The word "Advent" comes from the Latin word adventus , meaning "coming" or "arrival." In the context of Christianity, it refers to the period of preparation leading up to the celebration of Christmas. Today, Advent marks a time of preparation, reflection, and spiritual preparation for the celebration of Christmas in the first place. Advent is also the name of a certain type of calendar that leads up to Christmas Eve, with little gifts and knacks prepared in advance for each day. Pretty neat, right?


5

Carol


DICTIONARY SCOOP * Seasonal Words: Christmas Edition! * TabnfwmY
Credit: David Beale

You probably know what a Christmas carol is. Maybe you even participate in its singing. The word itself is derived from the Old French term carole , which meant a circle dance accompanied by singing. These carols were popular in medieval Europe and were often performed during religious festivals or celebrations. The songs themselves were typically simple, with repetitive melodies and easy-to-remember lyrics. Not too different from the ones sung today.


6

Myrrh


DICTIONARY SCOOP * Seasonal Words: Christmas Edition! * MlKIuSOb
Credit: Ben White

Maybe you know this one too. It's the stuff that one of the three Wise Men gave to Jesus when he was born, right? Myrrh is a natural resin extracted from the Commiphora myrrha tree, a small, thorny shrub native to the arid regions of Arabia, Somalia, and Ethiopia. The resin is collected by making incisions in the bark of the tree, allowing the sap to harden into a fragrant, amber-colored substance.


7

Scrooge


DICTIONARY SCOOP * Seasonal Words: Christmas Edition! * MWtGdhQR
Credit: Mariana B

The word "Scrooge" stems from the character of Ebenezer Scrooge, the protagonist of Charles Dickens's 1843 novella, A Christmas Carol . Scrooge is one cold-hearted fellow who represents the negative aspects of materialism and greed.
The enduring popularity of A Christmas Carol has ensured that the word "Scrooge" remains firmly entrenched in our vocabulary. These days, the word "Scrooge" is also used in a more lighthearted way, often to playfully describe someone who is reluctant to participate in holiday festivities or who is particularly averse to gift-giving. So, if ever you hear someone referring to you in such a way, maybe it is time to cheer up and join in the holiday spirit a bit.


8

Eggnog


DICTIONARY SCOOP * Seasonal Words: Christmas Edition! * JpYUlJLz
Credit: Veganbaking.net from USA, via Wikimedia Commons

Yes, you can make eggnog all year round but let’s be honest: most of us don’t really drink the stuff outside of the Christmas season.
The exact origins of eggnog remain somewhat a mystery, but its roots can be traced back to medieval Europe. During this time, a drink called posset was popular. Over time, posset evolved, with eggs being added to the recipe. By the 17th century, it was further transformed by the addition of rum or brandy. This alcoholic version of the drink was known as "eggnog," a term derived from the word "noggin," a type of wooden mug that was commonly used to serve the beverage.
Today, eggnog remains a beloved Christmas tradition, enjoyed in various forms around the world. Some prefer sipping on the classic recipe with rum or brandy, while others opt for non-alcoholic versions.


9

Mistletoe


DICTIONARY SCOOP * Seasonal Words: Christmas Edition! * GryRTOrG
Credit: Karolina Kołodziejczak

Have you ever been kissed under the mistletoe? This plant as a symbol has been popular for many centuries. Druids, Vikings, and many more have used it for different religious purposes and uses.
The tradition of kissing under mistletoe became a popular custom in England during the Victorian era, and it has since spread to many other countries around the world.
Today, mistletoe symbolizes love, fertility, and good luck. It is often hung in homes and doorways, and the act of kissing under the mistletoe is seen as a way to bring love and happiness in the new year.


10

Tinsel


DICTIONARY SCOOP * Seasonal Words: Christmas Edition! * TkaeGDEA
Credit: Mel Poole

Whilst perhaps not a Christmas word per se , "tinsel" is a term so imbued into the whole seasonal experience that it is hard not to come across it when thinking of Christmas trees and decorations.
The word itself comes from the Old French word "estincele," meaning "sparkle" or "glitter." It was made from thin strips of silver or gold, often used to adorn fabrics, garments, and religious artifacts. By the 17th century, it became common practice to decorate Christmas trees with tinsel, adding a touch of glamour and sparkle to the traditional symbol. The brilliant strands of tinsel were often draped from the branches, creating an effect that enhanced the beauty of the tree.


11

Wassail


DICTIONARY SCOOP * Seasonal Words: Christmas Edition! * IvdUQmeY
Credit: Jeremy Tarling from London, United Kingdom, via Wikimedia Commons

Have you ever heard of this one? Wassail is a word derived from the Old English phrase "waes hael," meaning "be in good health". Sort of like "cheers". It was initially used as a merry greeting and a way to wish someone well. By the Middle Ages, the term had evolved into a drinking toast, often associated with feasting and merrymaking, particularly during the winter months.
Medieval wassail was a mix of spiced ale, curdled cream, roasted apples, eggs, cloves, ginger, nutmeg, and sugar, and it was considered an essential part of Christmas celebrations. Today, wassail remains a Christmas tradition, though it is often served as a warm, non-alcoholic beverage, still spiced with cloves, ginger, and nutmeg.


12

Garland


DICTIONARY SCOOP * Seasonal Words: Christmas Edition! * LFlXgJzH
Credit: Metropolitan Museum of Art, via Wikimedia Commons

Aside from being the last name of a famous actress, garland is the word we use for those leafy crowns hanging on doors during Christmas time. The word itself stems from the Old French guirlande , meaning "a wreath or crown." In ancient Greece and Rome, garlands were used as symbols of victory, honor, and celebration. They were often made of flowers, leaves, or vines, and were worn on the heads of athletes, warriors, and esteemed citizens.
In the 18th and 19th centuries, garlands became popular as Christmas decorations, particularly in the United States and England.
Today, garlands are a staple of Christmas traditions, adding a touch of festive cheer and symbolism to homes around the world.
Paul
Paul
Admin
Admin

Posts : 41552
Join date : 2013-05-06

https://www.valleyofthesuncc.com

Back to top Go down

Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum